Without Reviews Books Don’t Sell!

bookreviews

I’ll say it again – without reviews, books don’t sell!

~~~

Sunday last I posted about a perfectly good, balanced review for my latest science fiction romance Céleste that Amazon refused to allow because its author and I know each other. Since then, thanks to Derek Haines telling me how, it now appears as an Editorial Review on Céleste’s page on Amazon.com.

It’s bad enough that many people today don’t want to read a book. But for those that do, the number who take the time to acknowledge the book they have read by posting a genuine review are rarer than hen’s teeth. It doesn’t help matters when Amazon deliberately remove reviews willy-nilly, under the pretence of doing away with fake ones, while at the same time bending their own rules, when they openly offer professional reviews for a price. So how can they possibly justify their actions while removing reviews written by perfectly ordinary readers who bought and enjoyed any given book? The mind simply boggles at what can only be described as Amazon’s blatantly obvious double standards where reviews are concerned.

We writers are always telling you that reviews sell books. It’s a great pity that Amazon fails to appreciate that simple fact. After all, if a book doesn’t sell, they earn nothing, as does the author who did all the hard work in the first place…

😦

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20 thoughts on “Without Reviews Books Don’t Sell!

  1. Actually most books are sold without reviews, specifically school and text books used in education. I really wish those were vetted by reviews. Then we wouldn’t have idiots from Texas, where a huge amount of school books are published and printed in the US, wouldn’t get away with teaching that science is opinion and religious mythology is fact.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It’s not just Amazon, getting reviews is at best difficult even from reviewers I know and or have know for years! Pay For Review policies are rampant these days. I understand that because there are so many people self publishing these days that reviewers are completely overwhelmed because it cuts into their lives and time. Therefore they either review for pay or even worse they’ve turned reviewing into a cottage industry of paying for not just reviews but for their promotion bundles as well. Think DirecTV or whatever bundle you pay for to get television, internet, movies. It’s the same with these new reviewers; they’re not so much as offering good reviews but you’ve got buy their “promotion packages” “services” such as editing which include mailing lists, promo spots, editing, etc. I’m going to try and figure some other way.

    Liked by 1 person

    • There is always another way. In this instance, it’s always been called reader reviews. Once you start going down the pay for reviews path, you’re on the slippery slope. 😉

      Like

  3. I know Jack. But I don’t have many readers anymore since I had a cardiac arrest last March and am still trying to return to normal activities let alone promote anything. I’m only halfway through Book 2 and my publisher is unbelievably patient with me. I would never pay for a review just because when I was a newspaper reporter we were not allowed to favor one side or another of anything. News coverage is not what it was back then. Nobody paid for anything to have a feature story, review, or anything else. I think this falls into that category. It reminds me of when I worked in the music industry, so savagely competitive it was literally a grind everyday and sometimes on weekends. That’s what this cottage industry has become. I just don’t know anymore…

    Liked by 1 person

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