Our National Day

English and proud of the fact!

beetleypete

This is a re-post from last year. Not only for the benefit of my many new followers, but also to remind us that we no longer celebrate our National Day, in England. We live in a world where so many seemingly pointless ‘Days’ are enthusiastically celebrated; from ‘Stroke A Pet Day’, to ‘Eat Some Chocolate Day’, and many others beloved of the Facebook Generation. Yet some acknowledgement of the long-standing tradition of the 23rd of April is hard to find.

St George’s Day

Today is the 23rd April. That date may have little or no significance to most people, and will pass just like any other day, with little or no fuss. But in England at least, it should count for something different. It is our National Day, though you would be forgiven for not knowing that fact.

Unlike Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, England does little to celebrate its patron…

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PTSD and people want to know

Everybody loves cake. I’m no different. 😉

the red ant

We’re coping.

Life will never be the same again.  Yep, of course not.  But, coping.

Had 2 birthdays in the family since;  Wildest One’s and my mother’s.  So my artistic oldest took on the task of creating a birthday cake for each:

robbi&meggicakemeggiscakeomicakeomicake2

It reminds me of the advice I was given when she herself was a toddler and I was trying to make her pretty birthday cakes.

Someone said, the kids don’t need the sponge cake underneath.  Just the icing with the theme on top – that’s all they eat anyway.

Fondant tastes yucky.  I think they put glue into it, and plastic.  So these cakes were more for looking at than eating.

Here is the 7th birthday cake Iain made for our oldest (I baked, he decorated) :

Robin7thBirthdayCake

Please remember to keep an eye out for someone who could take our 2 kitties.  Still no luck finding them a…

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At last I’ve got the historical characters almost sorted.

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As I’m now on the home stretch when it comes to the historical side of my current WIP Autumn 1066, I now have nearly all of the actual historical characters sorted. There may be one or two minor ones I’ve missed. Only further research on my part will determine that.

The whole story has led to one specific date in the history of my homeland, England. That date is October the fourteenth 1066, and the battle that determined our fate as a nation for many centuries afterwards. As I’ve mentioned previously (that’s if you have been bothering to read my past updates) it actually occurred seven miles northwest of the coastal town. Even so it is still referred to quite incorrectly by historians as the Battle of Hastings.

When I downed tools yesterday morning I had begun to assemble the players on both sides, led by Harold and William respectively, on the site in Sussex where it took place nine hundred and fifty-one years ago. This morning I begin writing about the battle itself, after I’ve posted this for you to read that is…

But what about your fictional characters, I hear the more inquisitive among you ask? You’ll just have to be patient won’t you. In other words wait until you get to read it for yourselves, when I publish it as a paperback.

Am I having fun with this one? Duh – what do you think? Of course I am. I can’t wait to begin the fictional side of the story. But let’s not get ahead of ourselves…

More later

😉

How can we encourage more readers to leave reviews for our books?

Sally on gaining reviews…

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

I am very keen to make reviews a prominent feature of the book promotions and encourage readers to review the books that they buy and enjoy, or not as the case may be.

Word of mouth is still the most powerful marketing tool that anyone who is selling a product benefits from. Authors are no different, and our books tend to be judged by the number and quality that they have received.

Part of the problem is that those who are not writers of books or blogs are uncomfortable in offering reviews and feel that what they have to say is not important. Many who do review a book, leave just one line after their star rating, simply saying that the reader enjoyed or disliked a book, but they do not elaborate.

That is obviously very welcome. But whilst a potential reader does not want to read three pages filled…

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