A Review

homage-to-catalonia

Finally after almost seventy years I’ve just read George Orwell’s account of his involvement in the Spanish Civil War, fighting with the Workers Party of Marxist Unification or POUM, against the facists, until it was declared Trotskyite and therefore illegal. Inevitably this led to thousands from the International Brigade being arrested and imprisoned without trial.

Sound familiar? The same tactic is still being used today. Nothing changes…

Here’s what I had to say in my short review:

on 28 September 2017
All my life I have wanted to read Eric Blair’s Homage to Catalonia. It is his personal account of fighting in the front lines against the facists during the Spanish Civil War. Blair (Orwell) fought in the Communist Brigade (POUM) and was wounded. Like most memoirs it can be a bit long-winded. But it doesn’t detract from the fact that it is a tale worth reading.
~~~
So there you have it folks. If you love a good story well told, read it for yourselves…
😉
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Go figure…

Turning Point

In 2012, I published the very first book I ever wrote, back in 1995 – Turning Point. Out of it came my science fiction space opera Onet’s Tale. While TP was largely met with scorn and derision by the total connards of the US, not everyone hated it. Since the rules were changed by Amazon, no-one buys it any more. They merely wait until they can get their grubby paws on a free copy.

Once again last month I offered it for free. Guess what, it’s being read again. This time here in the UK! With 209 free copies taken this time round, and one copy actually bought, the number of pages read works out at 368. Divide that number by 168, the number of pages in the book, and you arrive at 2.19 books read. A pitiful amount I grant you. But at least two and a bit people are reading it…

Here are the UK reviews:

on 31 July 2017
I know it’s a good SiFi tail but it so so believable as you read it it gets better and better I Loved it
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on 14 September 2014

I have been brought up on the legend of Mu and Atlantis, the secrets of the Giza Pyramid, universes that exist and contain intelligent life, planetary travel etc. It was therefore easy to appreciate the breadth of vision of Turning Point, a fable and a science fiction novella by Jack Eason. The story is based on the legend that planet earth had been seeded by intelligent life from other planets and universes. So we have here an alien race of people known as the Drana, and a subordinate race they seeded known as the Khaz, to rule over our ancestors, and who still control our very existence by manipulating our governments (the cartel who call the shots on earth?).

We have here an explanation for ancient secrets like the electromagnetic grid which surround the earth, the reason for the pyramids, the seeding of the earth, the limited use of our minds capacity. We have here remnants of a peaceful people known as Nephile (Mu) who want to contain the Khaz and the secret designs of Drana to return to earth and form armies and slaves to conquer and colonize other planets. But they find that they are incapable of performing that task, without the supporting DNA of earthlings who have acclimatized themselves to the pollution and life on earth. This can only be accomplished by choosing earthlings who is more conducive to their needs (traces of Shambhala here).

Enter Tom, a man on a holiday in New Zealand, who does not know that he is being watched and manipulated, so that he finds the entrance to their homeland.

You will be enthralled by this story as I was, and appreciate the deeply researched book, the scientific mind of Jack and a possible explanation for the seeding of man on planet earth, and other scientific folklore.

I highly recommend Jack’s book, Turning Point. It will a turning point in your life, from the mumbo-jumbo that is today passed off as science fiction.

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on 15 February 2014
This story is an EPIC Epic Tale. How to describe and explain that statement?
It’s well written, in depth and detail, without losing the thread or the plot.
Full of great characters, Human and Alien / Good and Bad.
The story covers just about everything you could imagine, what Ancient Sanskrit texts dating back as far as 6,000BC were talking about with their flying machines, who built the Pyramids in Egypt & South America, how Humans first got their thinking faculties, and a LOT more.
Combine all this with the nature of suppressed peoples, their resulting uprisings, the actions of WWII type Resistance and you’ve got an EPIC Epic Tale!
To say I enjoyed reading it would be an understatement, I lived in it, became friends with the heroes, cheered and celebrated their victories, mourned their losses and itched to help them when they got into difficulties.
The next book, Onet’s Tale – here I come!
I’d recommend anyone who enjoyed Asimov, Clark, Bradbury, Wells, et al, type science fiction, to read this book.
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on 22 April 2012
Jack Eason spins words like a spider spins a web.
With beautiful complexity and gossamer detail, the story is spun at the turn of every page.
As i read Turning point, I found myself continually asking one thing…’What would I do’? What would I do if I were to find myself caught in this web? What would I do if the world hung by a thread and i was given it to hold? And then I remembered. It doesn’t matter what I would do. It only matters what happens on the next page. This is not a story about one man. This is a story about all races brought together in cataclysmic union and the resulting events that will change the world forever.
As I turned the last page, I felt like I had been around the world and back again. I felt like I had seen and experienced more in these humble pages than I could ever hope to achieve in my own life.
The author, Jack Eason, not only entertains but also teaches in his writing. A thrill and a lesson at every step.
By the end you may feel more than just your perceptions turned upside down.
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on 16 April 2012

If you’re a classic sci-fi fan, you’ll love Jack Eason’s Turning Point. This prequel to his epic novel, Onet’s Tale (see my review here:[…]) tells the story of how alien life influenced Earth’s history and sparked a battle of universal proportions.

Reminiscent of Doyle’s “The Lost World”, the main character, Tom, stumbles onto a hidden realm in the heart of New Zealand. Within the prehistoric surroundings, lies a very advanced alien race, the Nephile. These angelic-like beings have hidden from their mortal enemies, the Drana and their cohorts, the sleazy little Khaz, who seek to enslave anyone they can. They enlist Tom to help with their mission to overcome the impending Drana invasion. The resulting struggles occur worldwide, resulting in a catastrophic war.

Along the way, Tom falls in love with a beautiful Nephile named Auset. This development, being the romance-a-holic I am, was my favorite part of the whole story. Their love and struggles here spawn the events that lead to Onet’s Tale.

The only things I would have liked more of were some deeper characterization and dialogue. Otherwise, it was easy to be swept away into this epic and deadly story. I recommend this, and Onet’s Tale, for any readers of classic sci-fi. Go grab a copy today!

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on 9 April 2012
Jack has produced a very interesting novel with “Turning Point.” It is far deeper than just another Science Fiction Story. Apart from the struggle between good and bad, and the development of the main characters stories and profiles, Jack explains a lot of the World’s great mysteries. One of these, is the visibility/invisibility of UFOs.
It also references the electromagnetic grid, as calculated by New Zealander Bruce Cathie. This grid covers the earth and its full power has not yet been realised by we modern citizens of Earth. However, in Jack’s story, its secrets are partially unravelled, including the mysterious ancient sites that coincide with the grid, such as the great pyramids and Stonehenge.
Towards the end, the story touches on the concept of the Gaia theory as presented by Dr James Lovelock. The Gaia theory proposes that all organisms and their inorganic surroundings on Earth are closely integrated to form a single and self-regulating system, maintaining the conditions for life on the planet. This put simply, means if we stuff things up, the Earth will take its revenge, wiping most of us out so other life forms may continue to survive.
The story was easy to follow, although at times I did get confused by the characters and their names, but perhaps that is just me, not the fault of the story.
In all a cleverly structured and well researched novel, and can be considered truly Science Fiction, rather than “Science Fantasy” which most stories of the genre are, since Jack points strongly towards the mysteries of the Earth becoming unravelled.
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on 26 March 2012

Take one adventure story, give it a sci fi twist and add world war three. Mix in some answers to historical myths and legends and you have Turning Point. Take a journey with our hero Tom as he crosses the world rallying support to overthrow the evil aliens, you won’t regret it.

I highly recommend this book for all lovers of a good adventure story and if you like sci fi, you’ll find it realistic and entertaining.

Carol Wills
Author of
A Titus Adventure
Five Minute Fiction

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on 3 March 2012

In a world full of authors, it’s a delight to know there are still those few who can tell epic tales. Turning Point by Jack Eason fits this bill completely. Set in New Zealand, the tale unfolds of how a likeable young man,Tom, stumbles upon a secret that will change not only his life, but of all humanity. Starting with his discovery of the Nephiles, which then leads him to the dangers posed by the Drana and Khaz, he joins in the fight for survival.

It’s a tale on a grand cosmic scale and so well told, the characters leap from the page at you. A highly recommended read for those who love science fiction and classic adventure tales.

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~~~
So if anything is to be learnt here, it is that books fall in and out of favour. The shame of it is that no-one wants to actually buy an ebook any more!

Here’s another…

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It would appear that what I said at the end of yesterday’s post has done some good.

~~~

on June 29, 2017
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
Before I read Jack Eason’s historical fiction novella, Autumn 1066, I knew nothing about Britain’s entry into the Middle Ages. I had no idea there was an end of Anglo-Saxon dominance. My interest centered on other well-known war histories. All of that changed reading the first pages of Autumn 1066. His introduction to two warriors, Aldred and Cynric brought the story to realistic life. Eason’s description of various army leaders in fierce competition for the throne set up the background for why the battles took place. The intrigue and intertwining of the characters relationships and motives to win kept my interest. Eason moved the story along with vivid descriptions of hand-to-hand combat, volley of arrows raining down, and shield walls set up and broken. One clever leader borrowed the Roman tactic of the armored Turtle formation that made the warriors invulnerable to anything hurled at them as they marched uphill into battle. Jack Eason kept a good balance between historical facts and a compelling story, well worth the read.
~~~
Don’t forget that today (Friday 30th June, and tomorrow Saturday 1st July, you can download a free copy of the Kindle version of Autumn 1066 for yourselves.
😉

It was a long time coming…

Autumn2

…but well worth the wait. Here is what the Flemish author of the award winning crime novel Baudelair’s Revenge – Bob Van Laerhoven, had to say about my extremely short historical novella Autumn 1066.

~~~

As a Fleming, I knew that my knowledge of Britain’s entry into the Middle Ages was sketchy before I started reading Jack Eason’s Autumn 1066, but, after having read his novella, I must admit that it was also based on clichés and vague concepts. Autumn 1066 remedied this thoroughly. Eason has the gift of condensing and presenting historical facts in such a way that, although manifold and thoroughly researched, they hinder in no way the suspense of his war-story. Eason paints a clear portrait of the growing tensions between various factions competing for the throne, and the leaders of  various armies, but also of the common soldiers, ordinary men who were forced to fight the wars of the nobility.  For his vivid, and shocking, description of the battlefields, Eason focuses on two such ordinary warriors, Aldred and Cynric.  When he describes the man-to-man fights and the deadly swarms of arrows, the reader can actually feel the fear and the agony of the warriors. In spite of the extensive historical background, Eason’s cast of characters, high and low, doesn’t degrade into stereotypes. They remain people like you and me, tackling life as best as they can when they are poor, and victims of greed and the overwhelming desire for power when they are rich. Writing historical fiction is all about keeping equilibrium between a passionate story and historical facts.  Jack Eason has done that remarkably well.

~~~

Hopefully Bob’s review will appear soon on all Amazon sites. So if he and Sally Cronin can deliver, why can’t everyone else who promised to write a review!

By the way, I uploaded the Kindle version yesterday at the KDP base price of US$2.99. Depending which Amazon outlet you use, determines the price you will pay. But if your quick off the mark, you will be able to get yourselves a free copy tomorrow (Friday 30th June 2017) and (Saturday 1st July 2017).

😉

The Importance of Reviews Simply Cannot be Stressed Enough!

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If you are a book lover, then common decency dictates that once you’ve read a book, to show how much you enjoyed reading it, you post a review. That is the accepted norm…

What I’m about to tell you cannot be stressed enough –  the reality of the situation is that without reviews, a book soon dies.

As I always review every book I read, it should come as no surprise that I’ve just posted one for the book pictured above. You can read it below. It’s just a shame that the few who bought a copy of my latest Autumn 1066 haven’t done the same thing. Ask yourselves one simple question – in the end what is it that attracts you to a particular book? Forget about the cover. That’s nothing more or less than window dressing designed to attract the eye of the non-reader.

Instead take a long hard look at the reviews a book receives. I’ve said it before and I’ll continue to say it until the day the cows come home. When you take the time to think about it, it’s a no-brainer. Carefully considered reviews are what sell books!!

~~~

Now here’s my review for Bernard Cornwell’s Stonehenge 2000BC:-

5.0 out of 5 stars Which only goes to show how little people appreciate a brilliantly written novel when it is presented to them by …, 5 Jun. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Stonehenge: A Novel of 2000 BC (Kindle Edition)
Stonehenge 2000BC is not a book to be instantly dismissed. And yet that is precisely what so many readers have done in the past. Which only goes to show how little people appreciate a brilliantly written novel when it is presented to them by one of today’s most celebrated writers. Don’t be one of Bernard’s detractors. Instead be one of his fans.
~~~
Come on people, if you bought a copy of my latest, follow my example – write and post a review! If I can find the time to write a short positive one for Bernard’s novel, then so can you. Falling back on the old excuse of ‘I’ll get round to it’ is completely unacceptable, and you darned well know it!
😉

Read the Reviews

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~~~

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback

I was gifted this book by the author in exchange for an honest review.

This novella may be a short read, but it so packed with authentic detail and action, that you feel you are reading a much longer book.

Our heritage is founded on the backs of ordinary men such as Aldred and his nephew Cynric pressed into service as were thousands of farmers and craftsmen who were sworn to the feudal Anglo-Saxon lords. The story is factual but told through the eyes of these two fictional characters as warring armies battle to gain control of Britain.

One army is led by the barbaric King Harald of Norway or Hardradå as he is known by his men. He has formed an alliance with the Anglo-Saxon Tostig, claimant to the throne, now held by his brother King Harold, following the recent death of Edward the Confessor. This invasion force has the backing of Duke William of Normandy who has made promises to Tostig should there be victory.

With all the various factions identified, the story then takes us through the build up of forces led by the Norwegian king in southern Scotland, the defeat of the army entrenched in York and the significant and decisive victory by the forces of King Harold at Stamford Bridge.

This leads to the battle that was to change the life of every man, woman and child in Britain on October 14th 1066.

The main characters are portrayed vividly, and their backgrounds and involvement in this pivotal time in history, demonstrate how human traits such as greed, revenge and jealousy leads to the deaths of thousands who follow them.

The battle scenes and the acts of barbarism are very realistically portrayed both through the eyes of Aldred and Cynric, as well as those leading the various forces. 

~~~

Format: Paperback

Autumn 1066 is a cafefully crafted work of fiction and fact. The author, Jack Eason returns with his signature blend of extensive historical knowledge and flair for offbeat characters. The story assumes the reader is at least a little familiar with this bloody era in Britains history. However the author does an excellent job of connecting you with some colourful characters on both sides of the fence.
A highly recommended short read for a sunny afternoon.
~~~
Don’t forget there’s plenty of space below these reviews on the Amazon site of your choice to add your own. Two positive reviews is a good start…
😉

Sally Cronin’s review on Amazon

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~~~

on May 18, 2017
Format: Paperback

I was gifted a copy of the book by the author in exchange for an honest review.

This novella may be a short read, but it so packed with authentic detail and action, that you feel you are reading a much longer book.

Our heritage is founded on the backs of ordinary men such as Aldred and his nephew Cynric pressed into service as were thousands of farmers and craftsmen who were sworn to the feudal Anglo-Saxon lords. The story is factual but told through the eyes of these two fictional characters as warring armies battle to gain control of Britain.

One army is led by the barbaric King Harald of Norway or Hardradå as he is known by his men. He has formed an alliance with the Anglo-Saxon Tostig, claimant to the throne, now held by his brother King Harold, following the recent death of Edward the Confessor. This invasion force has the backing of Duke William of Normandy who has made promises to Tostig should there be victory.

With all the various factions identified, the story then takes us through the build up of forces led by the Norwegian king in southern Scotland, the defeat of the army entrenched in York and the significant and decisive victory by the forces of King Harold at Stamford Bridge.

This leads to the battle that was to change the life of every man, woman and child in Britain on October 14th 1066.

The main characters are portrayed vividly, and their backgrounds and involvement in this pivotal time in history, demonstrate how human traits such as greed, revenge and jealousy leads to the deaths of thousands who follow them.

The battle scenes and the acts of barbarism are very realistically portrayed both through the eyes of Aldred and Cynric, as well as those leading the various forces. The action maintains its pace throughout the story and Jack Eason has recreated the terrifying and brutal results of hand to hand combat and archery.

This was a dark time in our history and 1066 was a turning point for a Britain about to move into the Middle Ages, Jack Eason has captured this moment excellently.

If you enjoy a fast paced story and historical accuracy then I recommend you read 1066.

Now, thats what I call a balanced review. Thank you Sally.

😉