Cataclysm

cataclysm

The following is the opening scene in another scifi novella of mine, born out of one of my short stories. Imagine if you will, meeting someone who to all intent and purpose, looks and acts like a woman, but isn’t. Imagine falling in love with her, or should that read in lust? Put yourself in the shoes of the story’s extremely naive hero. How would you react to her, let alone what is happening across the world?

~~~

When the breakthrough finally happened in September 2097, Dr Gilbert Briggs, the new head of the UK Advanced Science Institute, based in the English city of Norwich, volunteered to be the first human guinea pig. No one knew if he would survive. The Institute’s more senior academics instantly took a dislike to him, mainly because of his youth and fresh approach to experimental science. Since becoming his subordinates, they all secretly hoped he would be disassembled on a molecular level forever. As the boss, he was adamant that no one but him would be the first to travel back in time.

Three years earlier he had been employed as a very junior postdoctoral researcher at the Institute when the rudiments of time travel shifted from pure theory to a practical attempt at building a working device. There was one thing none of his detractors could deny, no matter how much they may loath him – he was a gifted academic with a superb analytical mind. He had achieved two first class doctorates at the University of East Anglia, one in theoretical physics, and the other in experimental electrical engineering.

For years the only attempt at time travel in its other guise, teleportation, barely succeeded when a few particles were moved from one teleporter to another. Whether or not they had altered irrevocably was the subject of much debate within the academic world back in the first decade of this the twenty-first century. Up until that moment teleportation was only possible within the realms of science fiction. But like all the fantastic, seemingly impossible things dreamt up by imaginative writers, time travel was about to become a reality.

The successful breakthrough was finally achieved when a laboratory rat was sent from one teleportation unit, lost for a few brief seconds, before reappearing at the other unit, seemingly unharmed by the experience. That was five years ago. Now the long awaited next step could be taken thanks to Briggs’ brilliant breakthrough – the Teleportation Gate.

The time had come to send a human test subject to a place and time in the past and return them intact to the present. The notion of travelling forward in time was ruled out simply because without a reference point in the future, there was no guaranteeing that it would be successful. Common sense dictated that at least by choosing a known place and time in the past, the chances of success were almost assured.

The Institute’s most senior academic, Professor Malcolm, exhibited his academic jealousy by sharing his grave misgivings over his former juniors’ momentous breakthrough with anyone who would listen, largely without success. Since the movers and shakers in the academic world had shifted their gaze away from him towards young Briggs, Malcolm did his level best through his dwindling contacts in the academic old boy’s network to expose him as nothing more than a charlatan and an upstart. While publically backing his young boss; privately, like his colleagues, he hoped Briggs would die during the inaugural attempt.

~~~

Briggs was suitably attired for the occasion in clothes of the period he was about to go to. All evidence of anything twenty-first century was removed from him. The only item he would take from the present was the minute electronic device, another of his innovative designs, which in effect was a miniaturised homing beacon that sat hidden beneath the skin at the nape of his neck, enabling the Institute technicians to lock on, and hopefully return him.

Briggs was being sent back to eleventh century England. His mission was to observe all that unfolded on the momentous day at Hastings when the decisive battle of the Norman invasion took place. Even though the battle is well documented, how true the reports actually were was anyone’s guess. If nothing else, at least he would separate fact from poetic license. It was heavily emphasised by the Institute’s historical research department that under no circumstances was he to participate in any way shape or form other than mere observation. Should he do so, he may inadvertently change history.

Briggs was about to step into the unknown. Gathering up his leather shoulder bag and wooden staff, with trepidation he strode towards the Teleportation Gate. The operators checked that his chip’s homing signal was being received, before pre-setting the destination date and place. Nodding that he was ready, he stood patiently waiting for the process to begin. The technicians checked over all of the Gate’s failsafe systems one last time. Then at his command, the teleporter’s power slowly began to build.

His body began to tingle, not in an unpleasant way. Every atom of his very being was excited by the process as the Gate slowly disassembled him before sending him back in time.

~~~

Before he realized it he found himself standing on a small mound at the edge of the Great Weald – the massive forest that still covered the English countryside back then, behind Senlac ridge where the Anglo-Saxon army’s vast shield wall stood. The date was October 14th 1066.

His mind drew comparisons between the empty eleventh century countryside he was now observing and the heavily populated East Sussex of the late twenty-first century that he knew. Taking a deep breath of sweet unpolluted fresh air, he lifted his hand to shield his eyes while taking in the scene before him.

In the far distance immediately below where the Anglo-Saxon army stood defiant, Briggs could see Norman cavalrymen on their horses. Behind them were the foot soldiers and archers of the invading army from across the Channel.

By landing his invasion force at Pevensey, Duke William of Normandy had forced England’s King Harold into a bloody showdown. His Norman army marched the relatively few kilometres up from the beach after hearing that Harold had just arrived and was assembling his army in readiness for battle.

Briggs stared in utter amazement at the very real, and tall figure, out of England’s historical past – the Anglo-Saxon king Harold, seated on his horse a little way behind his shield wall.

A body of heavily armed bearded fyrdmen walked out of the forest behind Briggs bringing him back to reality. “What are you doing here lad? You should be down there with our brothers, not skulking up here on the hill like a coward!”

Briggs felt rough hands haul him to his feet. A spear point dug into his back as he was prodded down the hill towards the shield wall. Despite the passage of time, Briggs could understand the old English that his accuser spoke, or at least enough of the words to get the sense of what he was saying.

“Here’s another volunteer my lord,” his accuser informed Earl Gyrth, brother of King Harold, and the Housecarl in charge of the shield wall. A sword and shield were thrust into Brigg’s unwilling hands…

~~~

If you want to know what happens next, you know what to do. Buy your copy from your nearest Amazon outlet. One other thing, don’t forget that if you do enjoy it – review it! The following links are the two main ones:

Amazon.com

and

Amazon.co.uk

Here is another one of mine

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For hundreds of years history books went unchallenged and all religious beliefs were considered to be inviolable, never to be questioned, until the era of the Teleportation Gate. Consider what would occur if the origins of mankind, together with many of the preconceptions we hold dear concerning religion, were proven to be false. How would you react? At the end of the twenty-first century, time travel became a reality. Humanity was about to get an unwelcome wakeup call. Nothing is every straight forward…

~~~

Cataclysm has yet to become the target of Amazons Trolls. Here are all seven of its reviews so far:

It’s hard to put a “genre” on “Cataclysm” and that’s just what I like in “modern literature”. Although the novel is short, Jack Eason manages to touch a lot of fascinating themes without giving the impression that the story is rushed. Literature harbours a great deal of tales about time-travel, but “Cataclysm” adds a kind of “philosophical” outlook on the legends about our origins, the concept of time, and even the definition of gender, to name just a few subjects. Jack Eason clearly is a well-read author who is interested in science and a wide variety of topics. Still, in spite of the richness of ideas, “Cataclysm” is not didactic: the laconic humor and the terrific no-nonsense style turn this idea-rich novel also into a grand adventure with boisterous characters and even an alien romance with a surprising emotional end. When you read a lot like I do, you notice that after a while many novels turn into a blur. I don’t think I will see it happen with this one. Well done, Mr. Eason
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on March 29, 2015
Dr Gilbert Briggs invents a time machine in 2097, and from the first page of this fast paced novella, the action doesn’t stop. The secrets of ancient Earth have always fascinated me, and I loved this take on it. Gilbert and his New Zealand cohort head back to various times in the history of the planet, and find the Sun King of the Maya to be an alien, who they befriend. I don’t want to write any spoilers, so all I’ll say is that the love at the end of this book is definitely bittersweet, and the action and time mind bending were great. Romp of a story.
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on December 15, 2014

If prehistory is an interest of yours, this is the book for you! Briggs invents a time machine and after a little political jealousy erupts, he begins a Sherlock Holmes type of trek through time, stumbling upon an alien race that lives amongst us. Soon the time travel team is caught up in a hunt that takes them from the present to the past in a fast paced chase to keep history intact.

Done in a narrative style, it covers many theories of our existence as well as a vast knowledge of geology, history, and politics. Arianna, an alien of a most curious nature, brings a different dynamic to the story. An adult adventure read.

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on November 24, 2014

Cataclysm carries distinct echoes of Daeniken’s Chariots of the Gods. The premise is exciting, if somewhat familiar: an ingenious scientist builds a time machine and uses it to discover the truth behind humanity’s creation. What sets apart Cataclysm from similar books is the author’s passionate take on various subjects, from religion to third gender rights. For many, this will be the book’s strongest point.

However, it occasionally meant focusing on one subject but skimming through another. For example, the time travelers come across a city in the Black Sea, 3 mil. years ago. I expected a detailed description of such an amazing discovery; instead, the whole episode is over in a few pages. Oh the other hand, the hero’s apartment is described in exhaustive detail, and an anti-religious speech takes up a number of pages. Similarly, the ending felt somewhat rushed, with a strangely indirect resolution.

Still, if you’re not easily offended and are looking for a challenging, passionate book and an interesting story, this is a book worth checking out.

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on November 9, 2014
This is an example of an extraordinary author with a voluminous knowledge to share. Cataclysm is a wonderful beginning of a series that will captivate the world. Jack has dealt so well with some difficult topics and expounded upon them quite eloquently. I am thoroughly invested in this concept.
Thank you Jack
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on November 7, 2014
Jack Eason spins another of his ripping yarns in, Cataclysm. His rich knowledge of history along with ancient myths and legends thread through each page, and true to his unique storytelling style, it is punctuated with the occasional pithy dash of the language and dry humour that marks his Kiwi and English upbringing. While Cataclysm has an element of science fiction to it, it is in the historical facts, and myths, which are intertwined with the present that make this such a good read.
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on November 3, 2014
I was lucky enough to be a Beta Reader of this book prior to publishing and can tell you that it is not JUST a ‘science fiction / time travel / action / thriller / romance with a difference’ story that will grip you from the start and keep you gripped throughout.
It will also make you wonder if there might be an element of truth behind the premise of the fiction.
~~~
So there you have it, yet another story from me, asking to be read. Click on one of the following links to get your copy.

Why Is It That Total Rubbish Always Sells?

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When it comes to book sales, more ofen than not, total rubbish sells to the detriment of quality? Of all my books, the quality ones from my point of view stand apart from the rest as evidenced by the four and five star reviews they attracted. Yet for some inexplicable reason they simply fail to appeal to the majority of readers. Why is that I wonder?

I freely admit that my best seller to date is total rubbish. Why? Because it was written quickly with little editing! As a consequence many reviewers quite rightly condemned it. Despite that, it exceeded my wildest dreams when it comes to sales. It still appeals in America to this day. What does that say about readers? Not a lot…

Meanwhile, two titles I am proud of, Goblin Tales and Cataclysm simply fail to attract readers, even though in the main, they both have excellent reviews. As the title suggests, the fantasy anthology Goblin Tales is all about goblins. I thought it was high time that a series of stories was written about a band of friendly ones for a change. On the other hand, my novella Cataclysm is a mixture of scifi and a degree of poetic license on my part regarding the ancient history I employ within it, along with a tragic love affair between the hero of the story and a beautiful transgender entity. Click on the above links to read the reviews for yourselves.

***

It’s early days yet, but I wonder if my latest erotic scifi novella The Guardian,which I am also justifiably proud of I might add, will go the same way as the above two titles? In its case only time will tell. So far it has received two four star reviews:

Another Great Yarn. By Derek on August 4, 2015

Format: Kindle Edition

Jack Eason spins another great yarn here, with a little archaeology, a little space travel, a mysterious baddie of course, and even a little bit of spice thrown in for good measure! Top read.

Great read. By Chris Graham on August 2, 2015

Format: Kindle Edition

An enigmatic beginning to a fast paced story, involving quite a few nerve wracking events for the heroes before reaching a finale with a twist that will make you want A SEQUEL PLEASE.
***
Note that in neither case did the reviewer feel the urge to condemn or pore scorn, despite the popularly held misconception that any book these days must have a mix of good and bad reviews to make it appeal. Here’s hoping that The Guardian appeals. If you are currently reading it, or have just finished, please add your review to the first two.
Thanks
😉

Bob Van Laerhoven’s review of Cataclysm

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Think back a few days. If you remember, the Belgian novelist Bob Van Laerhoven and I agreed to read each other’s book and review it. In my case I read and reviewed the Kindle version of his short story collection – Dangerous Obsessions.

For his part Bob read the paperback version of my novella Cataclysm (click the above cover). Here is what he had to say in his review:

5.0 out of 5 stars  An adventure in time and thoughts

Format: Paperback
It’s hard to put a “genre” on “Cataclysm” and that’s just what I like in “modern literature”. Although the novel is short, Jack Eason manages to touch a lot of fascinating themes without giving the impression that the story is rushed. Literature harbours a great deal of tales about time-travel, but “Cataclysm” adds a kind of “philosophical” outlook on the legends about our origins, the concept of time, and even the definition of gender, to name just a few subjects. Jack Eason clearly is a well-read author who is interested in science and a wide variety of topics. Still, in spite of the richness of ideas, “Cataclysm” is not didactic: the laconic humor and the terrific no-nonsense style turn this idea-rich novel also into a grand adventure with boisterous characters and even an alien romance with a surprising emotional end. When you read a lot like I do, you notice that after a while many novels turn into a blur. I don’t think I will see it happen with this one. Well done, Mr. Eason.
***
I don’t know about you, but I wish that all reviews on Amazon were written like the above. In other words, non critical. Not once does he moan about anything in the story, or bitch about how the story was written, or even the New Zealand version of the English language used. If you are planning on writing a review for any book now or in the future people, pay attention to the way Bob composed the above.
Thanks Bob, much appreciated.
😉

Cataclysm – A Review

Cataclysm

For hundreds of years history books went unchallenged and all religious beliefs were considered to be inviolable, never to be questioned, until the era of the Teleportation Gate. Consider what would occur if the origins of mankind, together with many of the preconceptions we hold dear concerning religion, were proven to be false. How would you react? At the end of the twenty-first century, time travel became a reality. Humanity was about to get an unwelcome wakeup call.

Nothing is every straight forward…

***

A very dear friend and fellow blogger who lives in South Africa, the lovely Jo Robinson, recently read and kindly reviewed my novella Cataclysm, written last year (2014).

Take note one and all, this is how a review should always be written. It’s brief and very much to the point, with not a scathing comment in sight, nor any plea for the author of the work to delete something the reviewer objected too; either that or a demand that various scenes include more detail than they already do.

At one time or another, we’ve all had these various negative types of review. Despite what the ill-informed and some publishers today may hold to be the truth, negative and often wordy complaining reviews simply don’t sell books! But neither do they hinder sales. Usually they are ignored. On the other hand, people do read reviews like this one.

***

Here is what Jo had to say about Cataclysm:

5.0 out of 5 stars Fast Paced Action March 29, 2015
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Dr Gilbert Briggs invents a time machine in 2097, and from the first page of this fast paced novella, the action doesn’t stop. The secrets of ancient Earth have always fascinated me, and I loved this take on it. Gilbert and his New Zealand cohort head back to various times in the history of the planet, and find the Sun King of the Maya to be an alien, who they befriend. I don’t want to write any spoilers, so all I’ll say is that the love at the end of this book is definitely bittersweet, and the action and time mind bending were great. Romp of a story.
***
Many, many thanks Jo
If what Jo had to say intrigued you enough that you want to read the novella for yourselves, click on the above cover to go to Amazon.com. Cataclysm can also be found on all other Amazon sites worldwide.

Cataclysm’s Latest Review

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4.0 out of 5 stars A challenging, passionate book, November 24, 2014
Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This review is from: Cataclysm (Kindle Edition)
Cataclysm carries distinct echoes of Daeniken’s Chariots of the Gods. The premise is exciting, if somewhat familiar: an ingenious scientist builds a time machine and uses it to discover the truth behind humanity’s creation. What sets apart Cataclysm from similar books is the author’s passionate take on various subjects, from religion to third gender rights. For many, this will be the book’s strongest point.

However, it occasionally meant focusing on one subject but skimming through another. For example, the time travelers come across a city in the Black Sea, 3 mil. years ago. I expected a detailed description of such an amazing discovery; instead, the whole episode is over in a few pages. Oh the other hand, the hero’s apartment is described in exhaustive detail, and an anti-religious speech takes up a number of pages. Similarly, the ending felt somewhat rushed, with a strangely indirect resolution.

Still, if you’re not easily offended and are looking for a challenging, passionate book and an interesting story, this is a book worth checking out.

***
Thanks for your honest review Nicholas.
😉

Of Goblins and Other Things

What's next on the agenda?

Obadiah Fingletook, the Grand High Goblin

This is the second progress report on the state of play with the new version of Glob’s Tales. I have just finished re-doing the eighteenth tale “I Want To Go Home”. That leaves just twelve more to go. Producing an up to date version of any book, means a lot of re-editing and some sentence reconstruction.

Since I brought Glob’s tales to everyone’s attention in my recent blog post on the thirteenth of this month, https://havewehadhelp.wordpress.com/2014/11/13/a-question-for-you-all/,  I can now announce that its sales have improved immensely. Thank you to all who have bought a copy, via Amazon US, Amazon UK and Amazon Canada.

As for my latest novella Cataclysm, apart from the number given away during the three day promotion, its sales are also climbing via Amazon US and Amazon UK.

Once again, thank you to one and all.

PS – At long last CreateSpace has stopped bickering over the technicalities of setting up Cataclysm to become a paperback. I am now waiting for the proof copy. If it meets my standards, it will soon be available for purchase alongside its eBook cousin.

😀 😀 😀