The reality of how Amazon’s Sales Rank Algorithm affects your book’s chances.

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The second it detects no sales or reviews it begins to push your book down the list!

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A few days ago my latest novella Autumn 1066 became available for purchase via CreateSpace and on all Amazon outlet’s worldwide. The above graph from Amazon Sales Rank shows where it was positioned yesterday.

The current low ranking clearly demonstrates just how quickly a book will disappear from the public eye if it does not immediately appeal to the always fickle reading public.

A few days ago after its launch it reached the dizzying heights of thirty-two thousandth in Amazon’s Best Seller rankings, and forty thousand, seven hundred and eighty-seventh in the books/History category.

No matter how well written a book may be. No matter how much money you spend on promotion (money that you will never recoup from sales) reality dictates that if the public aren’t interested in reading your book despite it attracting glowing reviews, it begins its descent to the literary equivalent of oblivion, as the above graph clearly shows.

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To help Autumn 1066’s chances, please click on the above cover and order your copy today.

Thank you

😉

Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – New on the Shelves – 1066 by Jack Eason

More from Sally. 😉

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

I am very happy to welcome Jack Eason to the Cafe and Bookstore with his new historical novella 1066. I am also delighted to include my review for the book.

About the book

Down the centuries the British Isles has always been seen by invaders as a legitimate target for exploitation. This novella concerns the last few weeks of Anglo-Saxon occupation, ending on the 14th of October, 1066. In Autumn 1066, author Jack Eason gives a great sense of ‘place’, of detail. The reader is right ‘there’ in that poignant year, marching, shivering with September cold (as ‘…no warming fires were allowed lest ‘enemy spies would soon spot their approach.’) From the very first few lines, Eason, practising his unique drycraft, begins to weave his particular brand of magic on his reader. Eason glamour’s with well-crafted dialogue, drawing his reader into the time and into the action. To accomplish…

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Thinking Fiction: What Novels Do Fiction Editors Read?

Wonder about it no longer…

An American Editor

by Carolyn Haley

In follow-up to my survey about what editors in general read for recreation (What Do Editors Read?, I invited fiction editors to share their Top 10 favorite novels, along with something about their background and experience.

Thirty-two editors responded, comprising freelancers plus one cluster of staff and contract editors for a single romance publisher. No one working for a Big 5 traditional publisher participated, giving unbalanced results. However, I wasn’t attempting a rigidly scientific survey of the total editorial population. As with my first survey, I just wanted to satisfy my curiosity about what other editors read, and to share their recommendations for our collective enjoyment. The complete list, owing to length, is posted separately from this essay on the file downloads page at wordsnSync as “What Fiction Editors Read: List of Titles”.

Note that not every responding editor answered every question in…

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