Antonio Machado 1875 – 1939

More from Léa…

found-in-france

“My soul is not asleep. It is awake, wide awake. It neither sleeps nor dreams, but watches, its eyes wide open, far off things, and listens at the shores of the great silence.” – Antonio Machado

“Travelers, there is no path. Paths are made by walking.” – Antonio Machado

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While visiting Collioure, a strikingly beautiful beach village, several years ago with a friend, we ventured into the cemetery. On that first visit, I became quite curious as there were a large crowd of people surrounding one of the graves. The group stayed for quite some time and it seemed that it was a pilgrimage. After they moved on, I was able to take a look and unfortunately nothing more having my camera out of commission at the time. When my friend returned to France this time and suggested a visit to Collioure, I checked out my camera and prepared for…

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Graham Greene … the 500-a-day man

On Graham Greene…

Routine Matters

Graham Greene … the 500-a-day man

Graham Greene (1904-1991) was an English novelist and author regarded as one of the great writers of the 20th century. Combining literary acclaim with widespread popularity, Greene acquired a reputation early in his lifetime as a major writer, both of serious Catholic novels, and of thrillers. He was shortlisted, in 1967, for the Nobel Prize for Literature. Through 67 years of writings, which included over 25 novels, he explored the ambivalent moral and political issues of the modern world, often through a Catholic perspective. His most famous works include Brighton Rock, ThePower and the Glory, The Heart of the Matter and The End of theAffair which are regarded as “the gold standard” of the Catholic novel. Several works, such as The Confidential Agent, The Third Man, The Quiet American, Our Man in Havana, and The Human Factor, also show Greene’s avid interest in the workings and…

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Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – Author Update – Susan Toy, John Maberry and Jack Eason

Susan Toy. John Maberry and I, thanks to Sally…

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

The first author with news Susan M. Toy and her book One Woman’s Island which is now in print. I can personally recommend One Woman’s Island as I enjoyed and reviewed last year.

About the book

Running away from Canada, Mariana hopes to forget a failed marriage and the death of her husband by embarking on a whole new life. She moves lock, stock, and two cats to the small Caribbean island of Bequia. But the move brings more than she could have imagined. New friends ask her to help solve a recent murder in the expat community. And then there’s the problem of her neighbours, a young woman and her children. Seemingly abandoned by family and friends, Mariana believes they need her help! By becoming involved, Mariana is carried along from wanting to simply “live with the locals” to being overwhelmed by their culture, one so vastly different to…

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Wise words from one of my literary heroes

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Vain, selfish and lazy? Those sentiments Eric Blair aka George Orwell stated still apply for some within the writing community. Fortunately most writers I know are none of those things. These days the only people you will come across like that are certain editors and literary agents as well as some writers and literary critics. The latter category, especially the odd one or two who write for newspapers and literary magazines here in the UK, can definitely be said to be vain and selfish. To those two unsavoury qualities I would add a few others – condescending, snobbish, scathing and vicious, particularly when it comes to one leading newspaper’s literary critic and his deep loathing of Indies. Compared to him, internet trolls are rank amateurs.

As for the rest of what Eric is quoted as saying – writing is a long exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness, he’s perfectly correct. It still is. With a few exceptions, I seriously doubt that anyone who reads books has the faintest notion of what we go through when writing one. Blair was also right when he said that – one would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven by some demon whom one can neither resist, nor understand.

In my own case, what drives me to write is not so much a demon as the burning desire to share a story with you the reader. So the next time you read any book, whether you liked it or not, ask yourself what kind of hell did the author of this book put themselves through when he or she wrote this? How many sleepless nights did they suffer to bring the story to me? How many times were they afflicted with the one problem all writers suffer from time to time – writer’s block?

As if all of that wasn’t enough for the writer to contend with, there are the endless attacks by internet trolls, once published. In some cases they are actually disgruntled fellow writers who are seriously annoyed that people buy, like, and praise your work while shunning their own. As writers we all know at least one of these often angry individuals.

Some trolls are nothing more than malicious individuals hiding behind pseudonyms, thriving on hate while hoping that you will react, judging by their often incomprehensible one star reviews.

Do I still want to write? Hell yes, even though it often drives me to distraction. Once you have been bitten by the writing bug, everything else in your life apart from writing posts like this, and chatting to readers, writers and friends on Facebook, rapidly vanishes into the distance.

You heard it here first folks. It helps if you are completely bonkers with a masochistic streak when it comes to writing.

😉

Stupid Brain|مغز احمق

Stupid Brain|مغز احمق

Love this story… 😉

A Voice from Iran

My favourite memories of my childhood consist of all the beautiful fairytales that my mother used to tell us before we went to sleep. All of the stories that I share in my blog are those memorable tales that always taught us great lessons.

Once upon a time, there lived an unhappy young man in a small village. He decided to ask the head of the village how he could find happiness.

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The head of the village advised him: “Go to a not so far town towards the East. There lives a wise man who knows the answer to every question. Ask him how to find happiness.”

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The young man liked the head of the village’s advice and started walking early the next morning. He walked and walked until he saw an unhappy wolf. He asked the wolf: “What is wrong?”

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The Wolf responded: “I suffer from headaches everyday.”

The…

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THE LONG ROAD HOME

A fascinating tale from WWII by Adam

itinerantneerdowell

The Ledo road can still be seen on Google Earth.  What a massive   undertaking it was–to restore lost supply routes to China.  Some  engineers had credentials dating back to construction of the Panama Canal.

East met West in a colossal clash of cultures.  It’s a miracle the Ledo road was ever completed.  Myriad languages, superstitions, traditions, and religions complicated matters at hand.  Right of way delays due to evil spirits in boulders and trees were not uncommon.

At first, my father found, life in faraway Assam province, strange and new.  It challenged core values; if God were merciful, why had he been sent there?  Two years later, none of it mattered.  I was taken by father’s humble humanness reflected in letters home.  Quite different from the strict, everything by the Good Book patriarch, I remembered as a child.

War’s indelible stains tainted everything–same then, as now.  To survive, some bargained with Beelzebub.  Gambled, selectively followed orders, traded goods on the black market.  My father, like most soldiers, questioned everything–the mission, the war–absurdities of life.  Breaks…

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Thursday Doors – Vintage

Automotive memories…

Jean Reinhardt

Some unusual Thursday Doors this week from a huge vintage event that was held at the Cavan Equestrian Centre last month. I reckon a lot of love and a ton of elbow grease went into producing the fabulous shine on these cars.

It makes me feel old to think we once owned a Mini and felt cool to have a fairly modern car, lol. By the time we bought a Beetle they were considered retro. Sadly, it never made it onto the road but our children had a great time driving it around the acre of land that we lived on at the time.

Next week I’ll step even further back in time with a few more vintage beauties. Thanks for stopping by and if you carry on over to Norm’s blog, you’ll find a wide and varied selection of Thursday Doors on offer. Click the blue ‘frog’ link…

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