The reality of how Amazon’s Sales Rank Algorithm affects your book’s chances.

Capture

The second it detects no sales or reviews it begins to push your book down the list!

~~~

A few days ago my latest novella Autumn 1066 became available for purchase via CreateSpace and on all Amazon outlet’s worldwide. The above graph from Amazon Sales Rank shows where it was positioned yesterday.

The current low ranking clearly demonstrates just how quickly a book will disappear from the public eye if it does not immediately appeal to the always fickle reading public.

A few days ago after its launch it reached the dizzying heights of thirty-two thousandth in Amazon’s Best Seller rankings, and forty thousand, seven hundred and eighty-seventh in the books/History category.

No matter how well written a book may be. No matter how much money you spend on promotion (money that you will never recoup from sales) reality dictates that if the public aren’t interested in reading your book despite it attracting glowing reviews, it begins its descent to the literary equivalent of oblivion, as the above graph clearly shows.

41G4GHuzZ3L._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_

To help Autumn 1066’s chances, please click on the above cover and order your copy today.

Thank you

😉

Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – New on the Shelves – 1066 by Jack Eason

More from Sally. 😉

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

I am very happy to welcome Jack Eason to the Cafe and Bookstore with his new historical novella 1066. I am also delighted to include my review for the book.

About the book

Down the centuries the British Isles has always been seen by invaders as a legitimate target for exploitation. This novella concerns the last few weeks of Anglo-Saxon occupation, ending on the 14th of October, 1066. In Autumn 1066, author Jack Eason gives a great sense of ‘place’, of detail. The reader is right ‘there’ in that poignant year, marching, shivering with September cold (as ‘…no warming fires were allowed lest ‘enemy spies would soon spot their approach.’) From the very first few lines, Eason, practising his unique drycraft, begins to weave his particular brand of magic on his reader. Eason glamour’s with well-crafted dialogue, drawing his reader into the time and into the action. To accomplish…

View original post 1,032 more words

This is the aspect of publishing I hate…

18556957_1470764339612370_458512641279544534_n

… particularly when you see your new book already on the slippery slope to oblivion while you wait for sales…

~~~

I took delivery of six copies of my latest work yesterday, to hand out to friends here in the UK. I also took part in an advertising gimmick from Amazon to offer three people the chance to get themselves a free copy. While they were free to the recipients, they certainly weren’t to me. Not at US$11.40 each they weren’t!!! Was I ripped off by Amazon? Yes! will I be doing it again? No!

So far the only sales have occurred via CreateSpace. As yet my countrymen and women, the very people I wrote it for, as it’s our history, have yet to step up to the plate. What does that say about UK readers? From my point of view, not a lot…

As for actual sales, excluding the six copies I bought, so far the number stands at nine. Hardly riveting figures I grant you. But that’s still better than zero. Now if only people here would get their backsides into gear and buy themselves a copy. Meantime all I can do now is wait. I’ve never been any damned good at it, despite often being told to be patient! Oh, and the other old chestnut – hurry up and wait…

😉

High Praise Indeed!

674be7f7b394c4a91352e4c7bf43aaf5

Bernard Cornwell OBE

The other day following the first Amazon review of my latest work Autumn 1066, its author Sally Cronin paid me the ultimate compliment in one of her comments below the post, comparing me to one of today’s finest writers of historical fiction – Bernard Cornwell OBE.

These days for most lovers of historical fiction on television, while they may not know, or care, who is responsible for the original works of fiction which television series are based upon, even the mentally challenged among them will at the very least be familiar with two of Bernard’s best known fictional heroes – Richard Sharp (Sharp’s Rifles) and Uhtred of Bebbanburgh (The Last Kingdom).

When it comes to Indie writers like myself, most of us count ourselves lucky that what we write is not immediately  panned, or heavily criticised by the army of armchair critics, pedants and literary snobs lying in wait for the next book written by one of us. Which is precisely the reason why I deliberately published my latest effort as a paperback only. Most attacks only occur when an Indie’s book is only available as an ebook (preferably free).

When someone does dare to speak up for a book written by an Indie, it makes an extremely rare and pleasant change. So now all I have to do is hope and pray that Autumn 1066 becomes a best seller, while I search for another moment in history to write about, probably once again from the Dark Ages, starting in a few month’s time.

PS – one of my favourite books was written years ago by Bernard – Stonehenge 2000BC. As I recall it was heavily criticised as being sluggish, boring and long-winded, which by the way it isn’t. But then again, what can you expect from utterly ignorant individuals who wouldn’t know a good book when they see it?

😉